Celebrating Black Women in History ~ VIII

Mary McCleod Bethune quote

“Mary McLeod Bethune (July 10, 1875 – May 18, 1955) was the founder of Bethune-Cookman College. She also served as a New Deal government official — she was one of the 20 highest-level offices held by women in the administration, and the highest held by an African American woman. She played a key role in founding FDR’s “black cabinet.” She also served as president of the National Association of Colored Women, and she founded and served as president of the National Council of Negro Women.
She was known for  improving educational opportunities for African Americans; president, National Association of Colored Women; founder, National Council of Negro Women. Her statue in Washington, DC, was the first statue depicting any woman or African American in any park in the nation’s capital. Her home is a National Historic Landmark. “

Biography Link

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Celebrating Black Women in History ~ VII

Daisy Bates quote

“Daisy Bates (November 11, 1914 – November 4, 1999) was raised in Huttig, Arkansas, by adoptive parents. In 1941, she married L. C. Bates, a friend of her father. L. C. was a journalist, though he worked selling insurance during the 1930s.
L. C. and Daisy Bates invested in a newspaper, the Arkansas State Press. In 1942, the paper reported on a local case where a black soldier, on leave from Camp Robinson, was shot by a local policeman. An advertising boycott nearly broke the paper, but a statewide circulation campaign increased the readership, and restored its financial viability.
She is known most for her role in 1957 integration of Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. The students who integrated Central High School are known as the Little Rock Nine.”

The man who never makes a mistake always takes orders from one who does. No man or woman who tries to pursue an ideal in his or her own way is without enemies.

Celebrating Black Women in History ~ VI

Gwendolyn Brooks quote

Gwendolyn Brooks was born in Topeka, Kansas, in 1917 and raised in Chicago. She was the author of more than twenty books of poetry, and numerous other books including a novel.
In 1968 she was named Poet Laureate for the state of Illinois, and from 1985-86 she was Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress. She also received an American Academy of Arts and Letters award, the Frost Medal, a National Endowment for the Arts award, the Shelley Memorial Award, and fellowships from the Academy of American Poets and the Guggenheim Foundation. She lived in Chicago until her death on December 3, 2000.
“Very early in life I became fascinated with the wonders language can achieve. And I began playing with words.”

Celebrating Black Women in History ~ V

Faye Wattleton

“Faye Wattleton (born Alyce Faye Wattleton; July 8, 1943) is the first African-American and youngest president ever elected to Planned Parenthood Federation of America, and is also the first woman since Margaret Sanger to hold the position.She is best known for her contributions to the family planning and reproductive health, as well as the pro-choice movement.”

“‘What can your kids teach you?’ Well, I believe something different about kids. We don’t own them, they have their own knowledge. From the start you have to make the choice to listen.” ~ Faye Wattleton

http://www.fayewattleton.com/

Celebrating Black Women in History ~ IV

Maggie Lena Walker quote

“Maggie Lena Walker (July 15, 1867-December 15, 1934) was an African-American teacher and businesswoman. Walker was the first female bank president of any race to charter a bank in the United States. As a leader, she achieved successes with the vision to make tangible improvements in the way of life for African Americans and women. Disabled by paralysis and limited to a wheelchair later in life, Walker also became an example for people with disabilities.”

http://www.gsgis.k12.va.us/

Celebrating Black Women in History ~ III

Madam C J Walker quote

Born Sarah Breedlove on December 23, 1867 on a Delta, Louisiana plantation, this daughter of former slaves transformed herself from an uneducated farm laborer and laundress into one of the twentieth century’s most successful, self-made women entrepreneurs.
Known as Madam C. J. Walker, she was the first African American woman millionaire in America, known not only for her hair straightening treatment and her salon system which helped other African Americans to succeed, but also her work to end lynching and gain women’s rights.

“This is the greatest country under the sun. But we must not let our love of country, our patriotic loyalty cause us to abate one whit in our protest against wrong and injustice. We should protest until the American sense of justice is so aroused that such affairs as the East St. Louis riot be forever impossible.”

www.madamcjwalker.com/

Celebrating Women in Black History ~ II

mae-jemison2

“Born October 17, 1956, in Decatur, Alabama, but considers Chicago, Illinois, to be her hometown. Recreational interests include traveling, graphic arts, photography, sewing, skiing, collecting African Art, languages (Russian, Swahili, Japanese), weight training, has an extensive dance and exercise background and is an avid reader.

Graduated from Morgan Park High School, Chicago, Illinois, in 1973; received a bachelor of science degree in chemical engineering (and fulfilled the requirements for a B.A. in African and Afro-American Studies) from Stanford University in 1977, and a doctorate degree in medicine from Cornell University in 1981.

Mae Jemison became the first African American woman astronaut in 1987. She was a physician and scientist who also spent time with the Peace Corp. After Mae Jemison left NASA’s space program, she joined the staff of a medical school, and also runs her own technology firm. ”

http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/jemison-mc.html